Spell check does not recognise ‘Brexit’

Currently, in the UK there is no escape from something the media has called ‘Brexit’.  It’s one of those media created terms just like ‘Watergate’, and all across Europe I picture journalists’ computer screens filled with wobbly red lines under the word ‘Brexit’, because spell check has no idea what it is.

For those of you lucky enough to have no idea what I am talking about, I have written a little poem to explain, because for some reason, whenever I think about ‘Brexit’ it translates into verse.

Spell check does not recognise ‘Brexit

According to politicians, Brexit means Brexit;
Although, it’s not in the dictionary, so you can’t check it.
It refers to a moment when the United Kingdom decided;
To break from Europe and now be divided.
The voting public were all given a voice;
And this is how they made their choice.

(vote leave)
‘They’re not like us’, I heard people say;
We’ll be better off doing things our own way.
There are too many people on our island already;
We want to set our own rules, keep our country steady.
We don’t want to offend anyone over the sea;
Because it’s not about EU, it’s all about me.

(vote remain)
But they were our friends and we’ve shut them out;
We offended them now, with all our shouting about.
It wasn’t so long since we were at war;
Peace time is precious, but we’ve slammed the door.
Isn’t it better to work as a team;
And all work together without being mean?

The majority rules and we’ve decided to leave;
Our democracy matters so don’t be bereaved.
The people have spoken and chosen our course;
Now, we need a plan, not anger or remorse.
Our future’s uncertain, but with our new stoic PM,
We May or May not be a Great Britain again.

S

 

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